On Pants

I have an affinity for nice pants. It has grown alongside my interest in finer clothing and fashion trends.

It started when I hopped on the nice denim bandwagon. I bought a pair of “Hazlewood” fit jeans from Blackbird Ballard in 2010, back when they still made clothes. At $195 it was more than I had ever spent on basically anything in my life (I was 17) but I had been very frugal in high school and saved my allowance. I waited eagerly for the package notification after ordering them online. It was a great “entry-level” denim: they definitely needed breaking in but weren’t made of cardboard. They stacked beautifully. Indigo so dark some of my friends thought they were black, and I was careful not to sit on white couches or even wear white shirts with them. The denim was relatively thin, however, and they did not have self edges. This didn’t ever bother me. The hardware was all Blackbird in-house and very nice. Their first wash came in about 9 months, the summer before I started college. I wore them very regularly but not every day. One spare afternoon I took a sharpie to the inside of them and wrote out many of my favorite quotes. I piked the idea of wearing something with values I appreciated physically attached.

Spring of 2011, before the Hazlewood’s first wash, I also got a pair of Gant canvas khakis. I bought them slightly too big in my excitement. These too I wore regularly and they fit in well with my high school’s preppy demeanor. In summer 2012 I had the waist tightened, which affected an interesting elastic detail in the yoke but retained the general look. They had 4 small darts at each knee such that the pant leg is curved slightly, which results in a very good looking drape. They have recently returned as my “studio pants” and now feature some frayed edges, a couple rips, and some large grease stains.

In fall of 2011 I bought a pair of RRL jeans on Styleforum. Jumped on the opportunity to pay $70 for a pair that MSRPs at $325. They fit me, but were quite tight. I could tell instantly that the denim was much higher quality—slubbier, thicker, more heathered. I liked them a lot but the fit wasn’t quite right and the length too long. I wore my Hazlewoods more frequently. I continued to wear corduroys, a staple from high school, through my freshman year of college. At the same time I got the khakis adjusted, I got the RRLs hemmed to fit me better.

In summer 2012 I also bought two pairs of black UNIQLO chinos and have absolutely loved them. They fit me perfectly. These became my staple pants sophomore year of college, and I sporadically wore the two pairs of jeans. I wore a lot of khakis at this point. (There’s a post on this blog about my search for the perfect khakis. Club Monaco was best but I destroyed them dancing one night.) After this summer, my pants wardrobe tended to black.

Christmas 2012 I got a pair of black Rag and Bone x Barneys moleskin trousers. They instantly became my new favorite pair, due to the incredible texture, great length, and fun little ticket pocket just below the back right pocket. The side pockets were unfortunately designed however and stuff regularly falls out when you sit. I have literally worn these until they have fallen apart. This past spring, I was wearing them and someone behind me asked, jokingly, “what version” they were on due to the numerous patch jobs on the back seat and pocket areas. I have 4 or 5 attempts at keeping them together, but the sear fabric is just too thin to last much longer.

In summer 2013 I saved all summer for a pair of “The Climbers” by Outlier. They advertise as being the future of pants and I believe it. They feel like sweatpants (and are as stretchy as sweatpants) but have a wonderful sleek texture and very cool details like notched pockets and a yoke designed for biking. Oh, and did I mention they’re highly water resistant? I was smitten. At this point I was basically just rotating the UNIQLO chinos, the moleskin pants, and the climbers. I wore the RRL some, but compared to the others, both pairs of denim felt uncomfortable. I wore the climbers two or three times a week for the past year. I washed them a bit too frequently—they have some ugly pilling action in the crotch. Some threads have come out, but by and large they are hardy. They were the only pair of pants I had for my 10-day Sweden trip and made for great travel wear.

During the 2013-2014 school year I realized I wasn’t wearing my denim any more. The RRL is sitting at home, maybe to be resold or given to my younger brother. The Hazlewoods, with a tear in my eye, were disassembled into fabric I could do stuff with. I have fumbled around with a sewing machine with them and have some further ideas. This is the route the moleskin pants will go too; the fabric is too nice to toss.

This summer I have already splurged twice. Having a high-paying tech job will do that. I got a pair of “Truman” trousers at Odin made by engineered Garments. As usual it was the details that sold me: subtle pleats, back patch pockets. They have a high rise and short inseam, which is a look I have embraced. When I wear sneakers they graze the top with no break. When I wear them with boots and my roundish glasses, I look like a train engineer from the 19th century. They aren’t black, sadly, but a dark navy twill.

I also just bought a pair of half-off very light-wash jeans from BLK DNM. This breaks a few of my “rules” in that they are definitely not black and they are pre-distressed, which I had previously sworn off. But they fit me fantastically and something about the aesthetic is exciting to me, a little more punk rock than usual. The branding is subtle and unlike my previous two pairs of jeans, these can stretch. Which, I’ve realized, is crucial.

One of the pairs of UNIQLO chinos is about done for, a couple patches in them too. The other needs repair of one pocket but is otherwise going strong. Beyond that, it’s the climbers, the EG pair, and the BLK DNM. So I feel on top of my pants wardrobe as I enter my final year of college.

Less worn, I also have a pair of black jeans from UNIQLO and a pair of green linen pants from Benetton. The former get worn every once in a while, the latter only on particularly sweltering days or at the beach.

I don’t wear shorts.

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(Source: videoth)

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Having an awesome summer living with my friend Joe.

Having an awesome summer living with my friend Joe.

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Lukas WinklerPrins, Technical Researcher | thicket

I am working part-time at Thicket this Summer, and it is awesome. I spend all day reading about graph theory and its applications, and prototyping how to channel that into social analysis tools.

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Anonymous

How do I know what I want to do in life

mfdaniels:

here’s what I did: stop working and see what you do.

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Time Management Tips | How to Live on 24 Hours

I tweeted this earlier. While I am wary of The Art of Manliness for being both heteronormative and painfully predictable, I think this article is a gem. Wordy enough for the message to sink in more. Grab every hour of every day!

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The course website for HTML Output, an experimental web design course I took this past spring at RISD, is coming together. No credit to me—mostly John Caserta & Cathy. But in it you can see some content I made:

Interview with Ben Pieratt
Print Dot Jay Ess
Kinetic Web Patterns

The course website for HTML Output, an experimental web design course I took this past spring at RISD, is coming together. No credit to me—mostly John Caserta & Cathy. But in it you can see some content I made:

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(Source: someoneaverage, via oats)

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Working on a Fuzzy Cognitive Mapping prototype for Thicket. You can really easily get limit cycles with a couple negative edge weights. Jagged lines are due to testing some time-lag implementation techniques after reading this paper by Park & Kim.

Working on a Fuzzy Cognitive Mapping prototype for Thicket. You can really easily get limit cycles with a couple negative edge weights. Jagged lines are due to testing some time-lag implementation techniques after reading this paper by Park & Kim.

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I like subway poster textures.

I like subway poster textures.

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In Bedstuy for the summer.

In Bedstuy for the summer.

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Dyer has a mind like—I mean this as praise, ­believe it or not—a plastic bag: It drifts easily, snags on everything. He notices foreground and background, the band and the bartender and the design on the napkin. He has one eye on life’s lofty stuff—art, war, time, love, history—and one foot in life’s sludge: indecision, apathy, crabbiness, self-doubt, confusion. His other eye and other foot have wandered off elsewhere.

Kathryn Schulz on the Harmonious Contradictions of Geoff Dyer (via youmightfindyourself)

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Balloon in an approximately steady airflow seems to be self-stabilizing. Cool.

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